Rog Walker: A Photographer's Craft

Living and working in New York City, photographer Rog Walker has a classic style that remains true to the modern pace of New York. Rog’s portraits are intimate and unforced. His images, stark and uncontrived, hold no unnecessary glamour. Rog captures moments of authentic connection between his subject and their environment.

The beautiful accompanying video shows how passionate Rog is about his craft and creative process as a photographer. Produced by Lonely Leap Film, directed by Nick Enriquez, edited by Josiah Spencer, and with cinematography by J.M. Harper, this video reveals a fascinating portrait of Rog as an artist. If you are viewing this post on a mobile device you can view the video here. We’ve also previously highlighted on the Journal some of Rog’s beautiful portrait work utilizing VSCO Film, which you can check out here.

In conjunction with the video, Rog created a practical tutorial which gives us an inside glimpse into his editing techniques. View the video to see Rog in action. Then, browse the steps and screenshots below to learn how Rog used VSCO Film in Lightroom to do a basic mood restoration on a photo of Chris Schoonover.

 

1. I generally work from a set of custom presets I've developed. Although I'm not sure what the VSCO base edit is for most of them, one of the presets I like most is the EKTAR 100 WARM from Film Pack 05.

 

2. I began by creating the base tone for the image. This adds a bit of warmth and contrast necessary for the mood I prefer once final color is added.

 

3. The split toning is the most important aspect for color mood. I added warmth to the shadows and coolness to the highlights.

 

4. I get a natural vignette from my lighting setup, so I removed this by pushing up the lens vignetting.

 

5. I prepared the image for tone curve edits by darkening each of the four regions.

 

6. Click to edit the tone curve and add two additional points to the center. Once the points are added you can draw a curve that provides the desired fade. NOTE: This is much easier if you use the VSCO Toolkits. You can just click to add fade or other desired elements.

 

7. I updated the tones to a final desired point.

 

8. Final elements include cropping out film borders, using the spot removal for dust (or exporting to PS if necessary), and saving the final preset.

 

Original Image

 

Edited Image

Introducing VSCO Film® 05: A Video Walkthrough

Today, we released VSCO Film 05 for Lightroom 4 & 5 and ACR for Photoshop CS6 & CC, a collection of consumer-friendly film emulations from the golden era of analog. The Archetype Films Collection represents our finest digital emulations to date.

In the following video, Zach Hodges, VSCO Film’s Head of Image Technology, gives an in-depth walkthrough of the Presets, Camera Profiles, VSCO Tools and more available in VSCO Film 05.

If you are viewing this on a mobile device, please click here to watch the video.

 

VSCO Cam® Tutorial: Highlights Tint

The tint and tone of an image can directly affect the mood that image portrays. Knowing this, we developed a special tool specifically for adding different tints to the highlight areas of your VSCO Cam photos. Adding a tint to an image's highlights can especially come in handy when the light areas of a photograph are blown out. It is also very useful for bringing out subtle nuances of light areas in the foreground. Follow the tutorial below for a step-by-step guide on applying different highlight tints to your images. 

Make sure you keep up-to-date on all of our past, present, and future tutorial posts by checking our Tutorials section on our journal.

 

1. Within the VSCO Cam Library, select an image and press the edit icon located on the bottom center.

 

2. Select a Preset that best suits the image. For this image, taken of a diaorama in the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, we chose the K3 Preset because of its analogue film qualities. The K Series Presets do a wonderful job of bringing out the golden tones in the land and sky. 

 

3. Access the Tools Menu to find the Highlights Tint Tool. To do so, swipe up from the bottom and press the Tool icon within the reveal menu.

 

4. Swipe left on the Tool icons to access more options, then select the Highlights Tint Tool.

 

5. The Highlights Tint Tool has six different tints to choose from: Orange, Cream, Yellow, Green, Blue, and Magenta. To apply a tint, press on a color to see the preview with the tint applied.

 

6. Below are examples of each of the six Highlights Tint colors applied to the same image. As you can see, a couple of the images have less of a tone applied. Read on, after the examples, to see how you can adjust the strength of each individual color tint.

Highlights Tint Orange +12

Highlights Tint Cream +12

Highlights Tint Yellow +12

Highlights Tint Green +7

Highlights Tint Blue +12

Highlights Tint Magenta +5

7. Pressing a Highlights Tint color once will apply the tint at full-strength. To adjust the strength of the tint you'd like to apply, double tap on that color.

 

8. Now, by adjusting the toggle, you can decrease the strength of your selected tint. If you press X, you will be returned to the Highlights Tint Tool. If you press the check mark, your specific adjustment will be saved.

 

9. After making your adjustments and saving the image to your Library, share your image with the hashtag #VSCOcam.

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please visit our support page.

VSCO Cam® Tutorial: Shadows Tint

Depending on whether you are shooting indoors, outdoors, in the shade, or under ambient lighting, the tint of your image will shift depending on the light source. Knowing that tint and tone directly affect mood, we have developed a set of tools within VSCO Cam to give you more control over the tones in the shadow and highlight areas of your images. These tools, called the Highlights Tint & Shadows Save tools, expand your editing options and enable you to achieve distinctive edits according to your personal aesthetic. For this tutorial, we will be going over the Shadows Tint Tool. Read on for a step-by-step guide on how to apply different shadow tints to your images. 

Make sure you keep up to date on all of our past, present, and future tutorial posts by checking our Tutorials section on our journal.

 

1. Select an image from the VSCO Cam Library and tap the edit icon located on the bottom center.

 

2. Apply a Preset. For this image, we found the S6 Preset to do a wonderful job in bringing out the brightness as well as natural tones in the scene.

 

3. Next, swipe up from the arrow tab at the bottom and press the Tools icon.

 

4. Swipe left on the Tool icons to access more options, then select the Shadows Tint Tool.

 

5. The Shadows Tint Tool has six different tints to choose from: Purple, Red, Brown, Yellow, Green and Blue. To apply a tint, press on a color to see the preview with the tint applied.

 

6. Below are examples of each Shadows Tint color applied at full-strength to the same image. Read on after the examples to see how you can adjust the strength of each individual color tint.

 

Shadows Tint Purple

 

Shadows Tint Red

 

Shadows Tint Brown

 

Shadows Tint Yellow

 

Shadows Tint Green

 

Shadows Tint Blue

 

7. Pressing a Shadows Tint color once will apply the tint at full-strength. To adjust the strength of the tint you'd like to apply, double tap on that color.

 

8. Now, by adjusting the toggle, you can decrease the strength of your selected tone. If you press X, you will be returned to the Shadows Tint tool. If you press the check mark, your specific adjustment will be saved.

 

9. After making your adjustments and saving the image to your library, share your image with the hashtag #VSCOcam.

VSCO Cam™ Tutorial: Highlights Save

For this tutorial, we will be going over the Highlights Save tool. Many times when shooting landscapes or portraits, where the lighting isn't even throughout, you can end up with an image that contains light areas that are blown out and overexposed. Even after applying a Preset and adjusting the exposure in the VSCO Cam™ app, the highlights can still be too bright. We've developed the Highlights Save tool to help remedy these bright spots.

Make sure you keep up to date on all of our past, present, and future tutorial posts by checking our Tutorials section on our journal.

 

1. While in the VSCO Cam™ Library, select a photo to edit. Here, we are using the Large view within the library, and as you can see, the image we have chosen needs a lot of work. First, we will be applying a Preset, followed by adusting exposure and contrast, and lastly, we will focus on the importance of the Highlights Save tool.

 

2. Apply a Preset. For this landscape image, G2 provides beautiful tones. As you can see, this image wast taken facing the sun, which was just over the hills in the distance. Becuase the camera was focused on the land rather than the sky, the sky is very bright, and the direct light also washed out the tones in the landscape.

 

3. Access the Tools by swiping up on the arrow to bring the pull up tab into view. Then press the Tools button.

 

4. Select the Exposure Tool located on the left of the Toolkit items.

 

5. Adjust the exposure so that the tones in the landscape are natural. For this image, an adjustment of -1 brought the mid-range tones to a correct value. You'll notice the browns look more natural and appealing than the image above.

 

6. As you can see, even after making the exposure adjustment, the sky is still too bright, and the dark values aren't really dark enough. The photo still looks a little washed out. When this happens, we will still correct for the ground by adding contrast, which will in turn also lighten the sky further. However, to remedy the bright sky, we'll use the Highlights Save tool. So next, press the Contrast tool to give the foreground more depth and tone.

 

7. For this image, we adjusted the Contrast quite a bit. At +4 contrast, the texture in the foreground really pops, especially compared to the flat and overexposed image we had originally. However, while adding depth to the image, contrast also makes the bright values lighter; so, the last adjustment we are going to make is with the Highlights Save Tool in order to bring down the brightness of the sky.

 

8. While in Tools, swipe to the left to reveal your other Toolkit options. Select the Highlights Save Tool, which follows the Shadows Save Tool.

 

9. For this image, we adjusted the Highlights Save to +12, which provides more balance in the sky compared to the foreground. When adjusting the light values using the Highlights Save Tool, a good way of gauging how drastically you are darkening the white values is by comparing the tone in your image to the bright white of the number, which is overlayed on the image while you slide the bar (In this instance, the white of the +12 text). As you can see, the white of the large +12 is bright white, and the sky is a slightly darker tone in comparison. Paying attention to the difference can help you in achieving the white tone that you desire.

 

10. After making all adjustments to your image, swipe up to reveal the pull up menu and select the check mark in the lower right to save the adjustments.

 

11. After returning to your library after you save, press the Share icon and share your image to your VSCO Grid™ or desired social media platform.

 

12. When sharing your image, make sure to include the hashtag #VSCOcam.

 

If you have any questions or concerns, please visit our support page.

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